Nashville Residential Interiors Photographer
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Behind The Scenes: What Is The Thought Process Behind Editing A Photo

Last week I shared the images of the rustic cabin in Grand Rapids, MN. I thought that it would be interesting to share what the editing process looks like for just one of the images. Believe it or not, this was actually a relatively simple edit.

The average person looks at an image, but has zero idea of what went into making that image look the way it does. Every image that I photograph can take anywhere from 5 minutes to over an hour depending on the complexity of the retouching that needs to happen. Because of this, I developed a habit of screen-recording all of my edits and sharing them with my clients (if it was interesting enough). In this video, I actually talk through my thought process for every decision that I made which some find interesting.

Here are just some of the decisions that are necessary for every single edit:
Are the lines straight? Yes – every vertical line needs to be PERFECTLY straight. I do not know where or when this “rule” came into fruition, but it makes a lot of sense. If your photos do not have perfectly straight vertical lines, might be time to consider hiring a professional.
Are there unwanted or over-exaggerated color casts happening? In almost every image, there are multiple light sources. These can create odd color casts on walls and other elements that can be distracting, or prevent the viewer from seeing the actual color of the room. These color casts come not just from natural and artificial light, but also from reflections. As you will see in this video, there were some very intense red color casts coming from the wood as well as a red chandelier. Some photographers remove every color cast, but I believe that images should look as natural and true to the space as possible, with some minor retouching.
Are there any distractions that need to be removed? To me, distractions are simply just elements within a photo that somehow take the viewers eye away from where I want them to focus, or something that distracts the train of thought from appreciating the space. For example, the wall plate I removed was a distraction to me because my eye kept going to it when I looked in that area.

I hope you enjoyed this. Keep in mind that there are many decisions beyond just these 3 that go into every single edit. Architecture and interiors photography is so much more than just showing up to a location, setting up the camera and lights, and pressing a button. That is just the capture process. To make an image requires attention to detail that only professionals will notice.

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